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at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and get to know you because i am sure there's a
the international consumer electronics show in las vegas with a discussion on government's role many technology. then president obama awards this year's recipients of the national medals for science, technology and innovation. and after that we're live as policymakers, health care industry leaders and representatives of government gather for a national health policy conference. >> congress returns today to capitol hill. the house comes in at 2 p.m. eastern to take up a small number of bills under suspension of the rules with votes at 6:30. also this week a debate and vote on a measure to require the president to submit a balanced budget to congress. over in the senate, members also come back at 2 eastern for general speeches. then at about 5:30, a vote on the bill to reauthorize the violence against women act, a domestic violence law that expired in 2011. a final vote on that could happen later this week. members of both parties are attending retreat this week. as a result, the senate will be out on tuesday and wednesday, and the house no legislative business on thursday or friday. live coverag
, from health care, from these markets that we're just scratching the surface in terms of technology applications. >> host: will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> guest: i don't know. >> host: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cu
their business plan, attract the mentors and advisers to help them build their technology. the incubators are contributing to a maturing clean tech and biotech sector -- sector. >> just a short comment. we focus in this building, a research center, on technology. some of it is near term, some of it is very long term. i am glad to hear what we suggest said. i worry personally that we do not see as many long term investments as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from
and players who are worried about the risk of football concussions. one company, unequal technologies, has risen to the fore with nfl endorsements -- >> i don't feel like i'm taking a risk. >> reporter: and three blunt words on every box it sells, concussion reduction technology. rob vito is the founder and ceo. >> these athletes need to take control of their own safety. >> reporter: his products, strips of composite material including bulletproof kevlar, that you glue into a helmet, but some experts are skeptical. >> the guy would have you believe it's his magical material. there's nothing magical about it. >> reporter: dave halstead is technical director at the southern impact research center, one of the leading testing labs for sports equipment in the nation. here's the problem -- the modern football helmet already offers excellent protection against direct hits, which produce sharp linear forces against the skull. halstead's testing shows the unequal strips can reduce the severity from certain angles like the front but not from other angles. and doctors believe many football concussion
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
out how we advanced to the next stage, how we build out these clean technologies and diverse technologies that will allow us to do your choices. more and do it in a clean and environmentally responsible way. raising our energy costs, imposing the mandates, other heavy handed ideas but are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they will not pass. we have tried it once. so, what we need to be doing as we move forward, rulemaking efforts, as we know, which will try to take things in a direction that i would disagree with. we need to find ways to develop those technologies that allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. so, we need to develop the resources that we have today. we do it domestically, cut our dependence, taking a portion of that revenue and specifically dedicating it in it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about our energy funds and how they would build out and truly help us advance. that is kind of the framework. it is good reading. it is thoughtful reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on critically important t
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
who live there and using technology do it and so but think about all of the townhall meetings in the past where we try to engage citizen for meetings a lot of time they are sparsely attainable tended people have commits to work on whether it's working or taking kids to soccer but this project is a revolutionary idea in that it's combining the meetings on the ground with people there and engaging technology so people are putting their feedback online and real-time with the community members that are not in attendance might be thinkings and after meetings we are able to have people see and improve their ideas on neighborhood in addition, to having big posters directly on site in a location and it has been a tremendous effort to watch the community come together on it and a lot of times, people think of the sunset and how quiet and sleepy the evident is and i have to say this effort has rejuvenated the area and gotten a lot of people involved in it and so we are pleased po to be here and honor the people in it and so daniel is homesick so he is not here to say how proud he is on
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
-jostling sensurround! [ laughter ] a lot of technology. [ laughter ] nation, for years i've been warning you about iran. they're almost as big a threat as our other enemy ee-rahn. frightening. also, freetening. [ laughter ] but now there's an even bigger reason to be afraid. >> iran has just launched a monkey into space, lauding it is an advance in missile and space program that alarmed the west and israel. >> how did they launch a monkey into space? [ laughter ] >> stephen: excellent question, gretchen. how did they launch a monkey into space? [ laughter ] the possibilities are endless. [ laughter ] did they use a giant slingshot? or a monkey sized t-shirt cannon? [ laughter ] or did they do the obvious: put yellow-tinted glasses on a monkey and wait until a crescent moon so it thinks it's a banana and climbs up there himself? [ laughter ] how did they do it?! >> they've got rockets over there. [ laughter ] >> stephen: huh. they've got rockets over there. i did not see that coming. [ laughter ] folks, all this time we've been worrying about enriched uranium-- iran has been acquiring weapons of macaque
and what he thinks of the company he started in today's technology in this trade. coming up. >>> later, the business of broadway. how the big bets are the real showstoppers on the great white way and beyond. way and beyond. stay with us. >>> well, the world's second richest man bill gates has a mission to change the world one glar at a time. the billionaire philanthropist released his annual letter this week describing the work his foundation is doing to address challenges in global health and education across the globe. i spoke to the man who made microsoft at the world economic forum in davos last week. in the road aweighedhead for the company he founded and his success successor, steve bammer. >> tech leaders, those are hard jobs. amazing things. be great. >> microsoft has not had an easy time recently. would you ever return to the front office? >> i'm engaged adds chairman on a part-time basis but my full-time work for the rest of my life will be the foundation work. microsoft has a lot of exciting things going on. it's a competitive field. windows 8 has done well. surface computer
, receptionists, not things where your skills get stale because of advances in technology there are plenty of all unemployed workers that work and technology fields or feel for the technology continues to develop. sometimes they spend that time keeping up with their skills. most people who are computer professionals are people love to be on the computer and love to learn the new thing. even if they are not working and i have spoken to many workers, they are learning new programs out there and learning new technology on their own because that's just what they do. the way i would read a book for pleasure, they will get on a computer and learn something new because that's what they enjoy doing. there is this assumption among some employers that skills are getting stale but there is no looking at the resume for speaking to a qualified individual if that is true. host: the federal level made an effort on this action as well. this was the federal fair employment opportunity act of 2011. it would make it illegal for employers to discriminate against the unemployed, job applicants could sue and recover d
care it is about discovering the cost as it is independent in the supply and demand, technology and all of the factors that set tom cruise's cost to $20 million there's a lot of illusions on health care and probably the most important in health care is the tale of two went in. elizabeth warren are geared in some ways corruptly that a lot of people applied for loans, subprimal loans without understanding what cost them with the disclosure and that this is one of the things congress could correct and did try to correct. let me talk about a second woman her name is becky and she's a 23-year-old who started work for the company. she expects to be really successful and she probably will be. she's an extraordinarily capable sales assistant promoted to seals woman. she's going to get to the top 1% of the income. she also thinks that she can never afford health care of her own. the system is such that even in the top 1% who is paying for the other 99 were but that's what she believes. of the cost increases by zero from now until she dies, becky will put $1.2 million in health care system. of th
announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. >> it has been almost a year since kim jong-un the third son of kim jong-il took power in north korea after his father's death. >> the other so
eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. >> it has been almost a year since kim jong-un the third son of kim jong-il took power in north korea after his father's death. >> the other sons were perceived to
and border patrol and technology. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: congress returns today, part of the agenda includes consideration of a bill requiring the white house to produce a balanced budget. the story today from "the washington times" airlines readers that the budget act requires the president to put out a budget by the first monday of february. senator harry reid said the gun legislation in the senate will include magazine size and background checks, but it would not seek a ban on military-style assault weapons. an amendment could be included to cover that. the president heads to minneapolis to discuss gun control. and the cost of the 2012 elections are in. the final price tag is estimated at $7 billion. according to the consumer confidence index, half the respondents said that the financial crisis went under the labour retirement plan. we are interested in hearing from you if the financial crisis delay your retirement. want to give us a call, the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. if y
him. >> how authorities in london responded. >> and new technology could help establish a colony on the moon. new approach being looked at by scientists. >> i'm meteorologist leigh glaser. looks like our dry weather looks like our dry weather pattern ends this up coming [ woman ] my boyfriend and i were going on vacation, so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot, even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely... looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. >> ama: police had to taser a man outside buckingham palace today. police said he sliced at them with the knife. they tasered the man and cuffed him. he will undergo an evaluation. >> dan: european scientists believe they have a way to efficiently build a colony on the moon. members of the european space agency they can use
today talks about immigration and home laws as well as border patrols, strategy and technology. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president but never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inauguration. meet anna harrison and other women who served as first lady over 44 administrations in c-span's new original series, first ladies, influence and image. their public and private lives, interests and influence on the president. introduced with the white house historical association, season one begins february 19, on c-span, c-span radio and c-span dot oregon on february 18. >> british prime minister david cameron was in algeria wednesday for talks concerning the recent hostage situation that left six brittons dead and made a surprise visit to libya. he took questions from the british house of commons in his weekly question time session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer a
technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. >> my next guest talking about giving everybody a equal shot of the american dream . want to keep black people dependent on the government. welcome back larry elder. good to have you here. point black. are the policy. democratic party good for africa-american? >> the policies are not good for americans of any race. i had atfis smiley and cornel west . i informed them under ronald reagan, black adult unemployment fem faster . hispanic unemployment fell faster than white . latino fell white unemployment and both of them said i was wrong. tavis promised to g
, a slow pace of technological change in traditional society means that once someone learns as a child, their information is still useful. but today, it means what we use in modern society is tobin is no longer useful six years later. and we older people are not fluent in the technology for it surviving in society. for example, i was considered outstandingly good as they stood in and multiplying because of i know how to use rules of math. today, this is utterly useless because any idiot today can multiply eight digit numbers accurately and conversely, incompetent at skills essential for everyday life. my family's first television set was acquired in 1948. only three knobs that i quickly mastered. an on-off switch, a volume knob, and there is a channel selector knob. today, just to watch television programs, i have a television set in my living room and i had to operate three tv remotes that i find utterly confusing, although my tone explained it to me. i have to bring in my son and asked him to talk me through it while i tried to push those wretched 41 buttons. but we do to improve the
or blackberry to understand the application of technology and what makes it work and what doesn't make it work. >> is very difficult to make investment decisions and expect any kind of return on investment and have no way to predict the future. our difficulty right now is that there is no consistency or certainty in our policy decisions. >> of the government's role in technology and policy from this technology show. >> this week on "q&a" -- mark shields discusses his early career in politics and his transition to journalism. >> mark shields -- can you remember the first time you did work in front of an audience
yourself and the american public wants to be able, semi-automatic technology has been around for 100 years. if you limit the american public's access to semi-automatic technology, you limit their ability to survive. if someone is invading your house, you should not say you should only have five or six shots you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, not what some politician thinks is "reasonable." >>chris: a couple of weeks ago the n.r.a. started running an ad that create as great deal of controversy. here is a clip. >> are the president's kids more important than years? why is high skeptical about putting armed security in our schools? his kids are protected by our tax money. >>chris: do you regret putting up that ad? >> it wasn't picking on the president's kids. the president's kids are safe and we are. >> thankful for it. the point --. >>chris: they face a threat that most children do not face. >>guest: tell that to the people in newtown. >>chris: do you think the president's children are the same kind of target as every schoolchild in america? that is ridiculous and you know
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it to see those who obtained freedom. >> coming up, technology is starting to crack open the hermit kingdom. thyou eat less...ing weiyou lose weight.et. it's a great plan... until you get hungry. that's the time to take slimful. one tasty 90-calorie slimful and a glass of water satisfies hunger for hours making it easier to eat smaller meals, and resist snacking. your friends might think you found the secret to losing weight. but it's no secret... it's slimful. eating less is a beautiful thing. the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. >> seoul south korea yaw is 26 miles from north korea. 22 years after he led the communist regime in new york they became citizens of south korea in may 2010. >> what was going through your mind when you held your korean citizenship for the first time? >> it was very
technology, a longtime critic bicycle rider the first to win the tour day france, he beat the french champion by using technologically advantages and by the with the french man he beat use drugs he admitted to steroids and amphetamines. to think it will take any of us to the top is not true with then they are vilified because they think people are afraid of drugs but not to eat a diet or training. john: i would add wes sick i surgery. tiger woods improved his vision and his game. >> why isn't as more reprehensible? baseball pitchers have reconstructive surgery who can throw better than before. athletes are competitors first and foremost, looking for an edge. but with the tour day france back at 1903 people have been dumping the entire existence only in the mid-60s it became illegal but the activity has never ceased to one place lance armstrong did not have the advantage was performance enhancing drugs but they are accused them. john: what about cheating? >> some don't get caught. john: they all use them? >> it is ubiquitous in professional sports. john: but not baseball or football, i don't t
decisions. >> the government role in technology and policy from this years ces international consumer electronics show. under night at eight o'clock eastern on c-span two. >> british prime minister david cameron was in algeria wednesday for talks concerning the recent hostage situation that left six britons dead and made a surprise visit to libya. he took questions from the british house of commons in his weekly question time session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. dispersed so they can go to the projects so desperately needed. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the cells i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. is it right that a mother and my contingency may not -- confirmed by his minister, her son serving in her majesty's armed forces -- [inaudible] >> the reforms t
company to develop technology that would better detect concussions. joining us now to talk a little little more about it, dr. marti mack carry, professor of public health at john hopkins medical center, and the author of, unaccountable. general electric makes a lot of high-tech medical machines, ct scanners and the like. they would seem to be a natural partner for the league in trying to come up with more information about concussions and how often they happen. >> that's right, jon. they are a sort of likely partner. they also do a lot of research on plastics. part of this contract from the nfl to ge, which is about $50 million, will develop safer, helmets, better technology, better padding, better equipment. the other part will probably develop better scanners. you know ge makes a lot of the cat scanners and mri machines we use here in the hospital. so maybe better imaging can tell us more about the early signs of concussions. jon: some of the players have expressed concerns it is not even the major hits, the major concussion-inducing hits that are the south of what seem to be the problem
. weakness in technology shares helps derail a five-week runnup on wall street, we look at stocks and the individual investor. >> susie: and michael dell could be taking the computer company that bears his name private, as soon as this week. a look at what going private means for investors. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: entirely without legal merit, that's what standard and poor's is calling a potential lawsuit by the department of justice, for s&p's mortgage bond ratings ahead of the financial crisis. these charges come five years after the financial crisis and would be the first alleging illegal behavior by a major ratings agency. as darrensh ger reports g, s&p is fighting back. >> reporter: what took so long? that's the reaction from critics who have long argued standard and poor's gave a stamp of approval to flawed mortgage securities that helped bring on the financial crisis. >> it has to do with the unique role that ratings agencies play in the entire system of selling and distributing securities and the claims that they made about their role for which
. i could finally breet. >> it is worth it to see those who obtained freedom. >> coming up, technology is starting to crack open the hermit kingdom. >> seoul south korea yaw is 26 miles from north korea. 22 years after he led the communist regime in new york they became citizens of south korea in may 2010. >> what was going through your mind when you held your korean citizenship for the first time? >> it was very emotional. it was a strange feeling to become a citizen in the country. >> he and his family are adjusting to life in freedom but sadly the same month they arrived in seoul his 7-year-old daughter died from an unknown infection. >> i always think about all of the things i couldn't give her and that weighs heavily on my mind. >> that ended a long long journey. there are so many mixed emotions for refugees to come out of north korea to china to south korea. >> three generations of the kim family have maintained an iron grip. but it is not completely inpen et trabl. >> balloons have been going across the dmz since the korean war. originally it was with leaflets telling people abo
that graduate from programs in science and technology. >> right. so there's something called the s.t.e.m. visa, science, technology, engineering and math. and it was actually funny enough mitt romney's idea of stapling the s.t.e.m. visa to the degree. so it's included in both the senate and the president's proposal of for anybody who gets a master's or a ph.d., they can get a visa. the president's proposal also says that you have to have employment. and the senate's proposal, all you need is a degree. the president has taken it a step further and he also has a startup visa. he has, he wants to lift the employment per-country cap so that it's not you can have as many people from a few select countries. right now we limit it. and so there's quite a bit there for silicon valley. i think that the questions for them are, will they get the numbers that they want? >> and those numbers, certainly seem to be fluctuating depending on who you speak with. last word to marcela. i'm going to need you to keep this as tight as possible. basically republicans are saying if the president, if they're going to be
a chance. ... feeling in the extremities ? no. technology can do that. who can tell me the third life cycle stage of the frog ? it can take a sick kid to school. nathan. tadpole. and help ensure a constant supply of clean energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger soluons. powerful answers. verizon. >> steve: super bowl is over. come on home, brian. >> brian: all right. sean did an unbelievable job. forgot to sleep. as did a.j. hall. >> gretchen: the clydesdales are here tomorrow. have a great day. plar there are new questions about the murder of the most effective navy seal sniper in history. chris kyle survived four tours of duty in iraq. but police say in the end he was killed this weekend by a marine veteran he was ready to help. gregg: kyle had 160 kills. the terrorists dubbed him the terror of ramadi and put a bounty on his head. martha: he was acting as a mentor to this man eddy ray ralph before police say ralph turned the gun on him and killed him. casey, what's the latest on the investigation here? >> reporter: this is a bi
't have five bucks you can tip with your cell phone, that is where technology -- >> technology makes culture. >> i was having a great time sort of commuting back and forth between here and new york and never really thinking about this as a place that i would build a permanent life. and one of the reasons that was, was because it wasn't a city where people were really taking responsible for themselves any more. there was no civic-- you know there was no sense that you do get the government you deserve. you need to fight to make things better. i mean i grew newspaper a small town in mississippi but there was more civic activism in a place like that, still, now, than there was in new orleans for a long time. people just had kind of given up. oh, the school system will never be okay so we're not going to do anything about it we'll just move out of the district. or you know of course young people are being to leave because there's no jobs. i mean our jobs, talking about the super bowl, we always do big parties well. i don't know if you were at the republican convention in '88 was one of t
is particularly important technology. because people confuse this gigantic group of stocks which comprises more than 50% of the s&p 500 constantly. tech is actually a whole group of sectors. semiconductors, disk drive, personal computers, large scale enterprise hardware makers, cell phones, tech, telecommunications tech, assemblers. each has a separate growth rate and i like to look at the growth rates of the companies i follow versus the individual slices of the sectors. because the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks are highly valued. meaning their priced to earnings growth rate are extreme. that means no room for error or hair as we call it, meaning something's wrong. reported a magnificent quarter. but the guidance for the billings was lighter than i was hoping. the stock immediately got pancaked and stayed ugly for a long time. why? because it underperformed its portion of the technology sector even as its growth rate would have been outstanding for a personal computer related stock for a disk drive, semiconductor, or cell phone company.
, there aren't technology companies willing to give us free access to internet service is, in my opinion, really almost criminal. because do you think twitter could put out a free wi-fi signal for south of market or for the tenderloin or for place where's there is a lot of low-income people who use services? who could make appointments online and search for health information? so in many opinion. that one thing of getting internet service into low-income communities, where you could get certainly used computers, very inexpensively. i have an older computer, but it's connected to the internet. and quite frankly, right now, i can't afford on my income to have regular internet service. so it requires me draging it to a cafe or somewhere, which does have internet service. why can't the mayor, who is going around to each one of these internet service companies why can't they get together and provide us in the low-income neighborhoods, which they are getting huge tax breaks on, internet service? that would be a huge benefit to me and i'm sure it would be a huge benefit to a lot of other peopl
around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort... individualized. at the ultimate sleep number event, queen mattresses start at just $599. and save 50% on our innovative limited edition bed. >> gary: super bowl 47 match-up between the 49ers and it was a momentum changer altho not a game changer.the lights went out at the superdome just about the time things looked dim for the 49ers. for a full 35 minutes.the superbowl was bathed in semi-darkness. this is video outside the superdome. it happened in the third quarter. fans were encouraged to stay in their seats but got pretty restless. the outage limited to the authorities are the power failure. but it's not a first for the niners. a power outage at candlestick park back in causing a blackout not once alex smith was the oh, and the niners ended up we'll be right back. at 11 -- the 49ers come up short after an amazing comeback in the second
gates. we will talk charity, innovation, and technology revolution. >>> then the big musical series that is helping to reinvent what you see on television. i'll talk to the man behind the hit series and get the scoop on "smash." >>> "on the money" begins right now. >>> this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now, maria bartiromo. >> here's a look at what's making news as we head into a new week "on the money." slow but steady. the labor department says 157,000 new jobs were added in the month of january. about in line with analysts's expectations. the unemployment rate kicked up to 7. %. but the job creation numbers for the previous two months were revised upwards. >>> the dow industrials wrapped up the month of january on a down note on thursday. though it had the best january performance since 1994. the dow
. motorists judged the automakers based on safety, value, performance, design, technology and environmental friendliness. it was a major plus for toyota to top the list, considering its recall issues past and present. fourth-quarter earnings wrapped up with a mixed bag of results for mattel, exxon, and tyson. mattel's profits dropped 17%, hit by a litigation charge earlier in the year. sales were up in its popular barbie, hot wheels, american girl, and fisher-price brands. exxon's earnings were up 6% in the fourth quarter on strength in its refinery business. but oil and gas production at the texas plant was weaker than expected. and tyson's profits jumped 11%, helped by growth in its beef and chicken businesses. investors showed healthy interest in pfizer spin-off zoetis in its first public day of trading. after pricing at $26 thursday night, zoetis shares opened at $31.50 and closed friday at $31.01. zoetis makes vaccines and drugs for livestock and pets. its a tough pill to swallow for merck & company. the drug company beat earnings estimates, but has released a cautious 2013 profit fore
money from parking meter because of our new technology. to offset the increase in revenue of $6 1 million we saw an increase in expenditures of $54 million and mostly in the personnel services and repairs and maintenance cost line items. so we change our from $7 million in the prior year. here is a picture of our bloat, which gives you a sense of our assets and liabilities. our assets went up $225 million from the prior year. the majority of it is in higher revenues and investment of capital assets. we shows decreases because debt service were decreased because as you know we resised es reissued debt. we had increases in other postemployment benefit, and our liabilities went up. so the full financial picture is much better. unless you have any specific questions for me, i would like to turn it over to the kpmg auditor, who led the audit. tiffany. . >> [tkpwao-frpl/], >> good afternoon, i will be very short. i have been doing this for 12 years now and on the audit everything went extremely smoothly. there was an unqualified audit opinion and the single audit, will be completed
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